Earnings Calls: Easily listen to stocks’ financial calls

I’m happy to show off Earnings Calls, my new side project that launched earlier this month. Long story short, it’s an iPhone app (and web app) that makes it easy to listen to stocks’ quarterly earnings calls along with the ability to get notifications, create queues, search, etc.

iPhone App Screenshots

(click to enlarge)

Features

On mobile or on the web
You’re covered whether you want to listen with your iPhone on-the-go, or at your computer on the web.

Listen live or on-demand
Listen to earnings calls live as they happen or on-demand at your convenience.

Create your queue
Create your own queue of calls to listen to later. Think of it like your Netflix Queue… except it can make you money.

Get call notifications
Follow the stocks you care about and get notified when they release a new call. New calls automatically get added to your queue.

View slides, bookmarks, & more
Follow along with the presentation slides and jump to the part of the call you care about most (like the Q&A session).

Background

Many of you probably didn’t even know that I’m interested in the stock market. My history with stocks is short but also pretty long. Growing up, my dad was always invested in the stock market. I have fond memories of watching CNBC with him in the early 90’s. Seeing the stock ticker go by on the bottom of the TV and hearing the talking heads was part of the backdrop of my childhood.

That being said, it took a long time for me to find a real, personal interest in the stock market. It really wasn’t until about July of 2014 that I started making a concerted effort to educate myself and properly invest. Once I started down the path though, I got hooked quickly. There is such a trove of data/strategies/resources/possibilities. Always more to learn and always a new leaf to turn over.

Love him or hate him, Jim Cramer has had a major impact on my finance education. He always says that if you’re not listening/reading the company conference calls, then you aren’t doing your homework. So, how could it be that listening to earnings calls was so annoying? I needed to find each company’s Investor Relations website and then spend 45 minutes listening to their call on crappy computer speakers? I hated that and rarely did it. I wanted to listen to the calls during my commute to work, while walking the dog, and while grocery shopping just like I did with podcasts and most other media.

So, being somebody that loves to build websites/software, I set out to solve my problem.

I hope you find it useful, too. It’s as much for you as it is for me.

Check out Earnings Calls! → 

Reportedly, the platform for your status reports [New Project]

Several months ago, I teamed up with Rick Turoczy to build Reportedly. After a short amount of time in development and a long amount of time in beta (invite-only), I’m happy to say that Reportedly is now in public beta (as in, you can sign up!).

What is Reportedly you ask?

Reportedly is a tool to help you keep your investors/mentors/advisors (or your entire team) in the loop.

Rick and I have both been on the sending and the receiving end of status reports. We know how valuable they can be. But we also realize that – when things get hectic – status reports are one of the first things founders put off. Often, at a time when they are needed most. We built Reportedly to help ease the burden of creating status reports, making the interactions between you and your entire team – both inside and out – more valuable.

Screenshot Pr0n

List of status reports: 

List of status reports

A single status report:

Reportedly Status Report

Key Features:

Every Status, Ever
No more digging through email threads. With Reportedly, you always know where your status reports – and your team’s feedback – can be found. With full status report history, new advisors and investors can get up-to-speed in a matter of minutes. And they can manage every company they work with, from one dashboard.

Obvious Engagement
Ever wondered if your investors are getting to your updates? Or which advisor is most interested in your progress? Reportedly highlights your team’s activity – monitoring every message read, every like, and every comment – so you always know who is engaged. And who might need a little nudge.

Enabling Conversation
We’re working to make this easier. On everyone. No matter how busy you are. That’s why you get:

  • Reminder emails
  • Templates
  • Markdown support
  • Private statuses
  • Emoji
  • And more! ;)

Check out Reportedly! → 

SeenDB is now Concert Archives

Hey everyone!

I’m happy to tell you that SeenDB has been renamed to “Concert Archives” along with the new domain name: http://www.concertarchives.org!

Don’t worry, everything else is still the same. The site still has the same clean interface and accounts still have all the concerts and photos that have been added. Personal links (for example: seendb.com/justin-thiele) still work as well.

So, why did I change the name? Long story short, the name “SeenDB” was pretty confusing to people. I’d often hear questions like:

  • “Is it ‘Seen‘ or ‘Scene‘?”
  • “What does DB mean?” (it meant ‘database’)
  • “SeenDB? I don’t get it.”

 

The name “Concert Archives” is much clearer and much more descriptive of the site.

I’m excited and hope you like it too!

concertarchives.org

How To Learn To Code

I’ve been meaning to write a post about my experience as “a business guy” learning to code for a long time. Today I rambled off 500 words about it in a comment on Switchboard so I thought I’d just repost it here.

tl;dr

The hardest part of learning to code is staying motivated. Don’t worry about trying to understand the fundamentals for computer science at the start. You’ll get lost in the weeds, get frustrated, lose motivation, and give up. Instead try to get some quick wins that will help motivate you to keep going. And start a personal project to learn from early on.

learn to code (Hackers)

My personal ‘learning to code’ journey.

In 2009 I had some basic HTML & CSS knowledge but wanted to become more technical. It seemed like a natural progression. I love making stuff and I love working on products. I wanted to be able to contribute to the technical side of products I was working on and be able to build prototypes of new web apps I was thinking about.

Several of my friends were Ruby developers and were willing to help me along if I got stuck. I got a book on beginning Ruby and was on my way!

…and then I gave up after  about 2 weeks.

A few months later I got motivated to start again!

…and then I gave up about 1 month later.

And this happened another 1 or 2 times.

The problem was that my Ruby book was showing me the very basics of learning the language. How to do math, how to manipulate strings, how to create records, etc. All of this happened on the command line. Even the little example app in the book was a command line app. The whole reason why I wanted to learn to program is because I wanted to make web apps. It seemed like a long road to get from working on the command line to getting something on the web. I continually lost motivation and gave up.

Things were different on my next re-start though. This time, I decided to look into Ruby On Rails since it’s specifically designed for doing stuff on the web. I got a new book (Beginning Rails 3) and within the first two hours I had an app running in my browser where I could create blog articles! It was a huge win. It blew my mind and cranked my dopamine.

I didn’t really know how it worked, but now I had the determination to find out. And I did. I went through the rest of the book, completed a personal project, and kept digging into more and more resources (Railscasts, StackOverflow, etc).

I’ve been actively programming since then (2010). There are a lot of fundamentals I don’t know and I’m not a “software engineer” by any means, but my goal was to be able to create products. And I have created a bunch of them :)

A Couple Resources

As far as resources for learning, there are tons of them now. It just depends on how you learn and what you want to tackle first. There’s things like Treehouse and Codecademy. Videos (Lynda.com), books, etc. Oh and a lot of cities have really good local meetups for coding beginners.

Good luck out there!

SeenDB: More Likable Than Ever!

I was starting to find myself writing lame comments on concerts on SeenDB. Things like “Whoa, this sounds like an awesome show!”. Well, during my time on Jury Duty yesterday, I solved my ‘lame comment’ problem :)

I created a new ‘Like’ button on SeenDB. You’ll notice the Like button all across the site, so you can like Concerts, Bands, Venues, and Locations.

Concerts I've been to

Hopefully you find it useful!

Head to SeenDB → 


 

The HN Effect: Traffic & Revenue For Dictionary Domains

Last Wednesday (Jan 29th) I made a ‘Show HN’ post on Hacker News for Dictionary Domains. Seems it struck a chord; the post remained on the front page for the entire day! I thought it’d be interesting to write a recap of (1) the traffic that came in, (2) the number of domains bought, (3) the affiliate revenue earned, (4) the mistakes, and (5) a few lessons learned.

I made the Hacker News post around 11am (Pacific time). It started getting some votes and made it to the 2nd page of the Top Stories  in just a few minutes. It got stuck between #31 – #33 for quite a few votes until, finally, it jumped straight to #10 on the front page! And once that happened, DD started receiving 150 – 180 concurrent visitors. It peaked just above 200 concurrent visitors right before 1pm:

Dictionary Domains Peak Traffic
There was a lot of engagement on the HN post. The post finished the day with 115 votes and 61 comments.
 

Traffic

The first day brought 8,832 unique visitors:

Dictionary Domains - Day 1 Numbers

The level of engagement is really interesting. More than 5 pageviews per visitor and almost 3 minutes spent. I expected the Bounce Rate to be almost twice as high as it was. Who says Hacker News traffic just bounces?!

As you can imagine, this was a pretty big spike and traffic would diminish pretty quickly over the next few days:

dictionary-domains-traffic-spike

Day 1: 8,832 unique visitors
Day 2: 2,755 unique visitors
Day 3: 1,052 unique visitors
Day 4: 763 unique visitors
Day 5: 467 unique visitors
Day 6: 447 unique visitors
Day 7: 293 unique visitors

Here’s the breakdown by traffic source:

dictionary-domains-traffic-sources

As you can see, almost all of the traffic was coming from Hacker News  (annoyingly, traffic from Hacker News is counted as ‘Direct’ and not a ‘Referral’ in analytics, so it’s hard to get actual numbers). The Twitter traffic was largely fueled by Andy Baio. Hacker Newsletter sent an impressive amount of visitors well.

Revenue

Revenue on Dictionary Domains comes from affiliate commissions when somebody buys a domain. Affiliate revenue is tough. I learned that lesson in 2009 when we turned on affiliate links for iTunes music purchases made through Mugasha. I’ve got the monthly $0.39 checks to prove it :)

With Namecheap’s affiliate program, I get 15% commission on sales (which is awesome) BUT only for brand new customers (which isn’t awesome). Between purchases made by current customers and people purchasing at other registrars, I don’t get credit for a most of the sales. Given my past experience with affiliate revenue, I didn’t have much expectation.

In the past week, 281 of the domains that I’ve posted have been sold!
Bonus: I’ll include the entire list of purchased domains at the bottom for those that make it all the way through :D

Of these domains, only 51 (18%) were eligible for affiliate commission. Here’s the daily affiliate revenue breakdown:

Day 1: 29 domains eligible, $102.53 commission [a nice dinner!]
Day 2: 15 domains eligible, $52.95 commission [still a pretty good dinner.]
Day 3: 3 domains eligible, $7.03 commission [a craft beer!]
Day 4: 2 domains eligible, $3.07 commission [umm… a PBR?]
Day 5: 0 domains eligible, $0 commission [ :( ]
Day 6: 1 domain eligible, $1.35 commission [a sketchy gas station beer]
Day 7: 1 domain eligible, $1.45 commission [a sketchy gas station beer & a mint?]

Total commission for the week equaled $168.38. The average commission per domain was $3.30, which is pretty good. .IO domains really help the average: I get $8.83 each vs. about $1.50 for most others.

Mistakes Made

The biggest mistake of Dictionary Domains is that I didn’t capture email addresses right away. I didn’t expect it to get much attention right away and I didn’t put much thought into email capture since I didn’t require people to have an account. On Day 4, I put Hello Bar on the site and it’s been converting like crazy. Since installing it, it’s converted 153 of the 2,380 unique visitors (6.4%). Assuming those same numbers, if I had added Hello Bar from the beginning, I’d have a list of 1015 subscribers instead of 153.

Lessons Learned

Good Enough Is Plenty Good:
Dictionary Domains has it’s fair share of shortcomings: it’s pretty slow, filtering is kind of crappy, it only has a handful of TLDs, etc. But at the end of the day, the most important part was having some pretty good domains that could be easily registered. As long as it did that, all the other features were ‘nice to haves’. An awesome feature that nobody cares about isn’t awesome. Provide the core value and ship fast.

Pay It Forward:
The biggest benefit of Dictionary Domains has been goodwill. I started the project to scratch my own painful itch: wanting to find a decent domain name. Out of that, I spent a weekend building Dictionary Domains so other makers/entrepreneurs could do the same. The positive response has been overwhelming. I’ve heard from several people who were finally able to put a name on their project (like Andy Baio) and even a few who started new projects just because they found the perfect name (like JB Uy). I’m super excited to start seeing the things people make with their 281 new domains!


P.S. I just posted 5,000 new domains and 3 new TLDs (.org, .net, .ly) to Dictionary Domains. Just in time for your weekend project! :)

Find your next domain name →

P.P.S. Thanks to Brad Bouse & Rick Turoczy for reviewing this post.


Appendix 1: Huge list of the purchased domains:

bawdy.us
chilly.us
eatable.us
futuristic.us
handsomely.us
enchanting.us
fluffy.us
ablaze.us
demonic.us
bouncy.us
chunky.us
jaded.us
lacking.us
lowly.us
meaty.us
melodic.us
purring.us
ritzy.us
secretive.us
joyous.us
spiky.us
stormy.us
utter.us
depend.us
groan.us
squeal.us
wail.us
amuck.it
wasteful.us
steep.us
threatening.us
fluffy.it
longing.it
thinkable.it
wriggle.it
caring.cc
closed.cc
boundless.cc
craven.cc
deeply.cc
encouraging.cc
friendly.cc
furry.cc
literate.cc
magnificent.cc
melodic.cc
lethal.cc
nosy.cc
proud.cc
sassy.cc
pale.cc
rigid.cc
talented.cc
testy.cc
trashy.cc
towering.cc
thankful.cc
upbeat.cc
uppity.cc
useful.cc
zippy.cc
zesty.cc
absurd.io
zany.cc
acoustic.io
astonishing.io
attractive.io
ancient.io
certain.io
adamant.io
addicted.io
colossal.io
angry.io
curved.io
detailed.io
dusty.io
educated.io
fabulous.io
dull.io
eager.io
eminent.io
faulty.io
glib.io
four.io
holistic.io
homely.io
industrious.io
irate.io
jobless.io
long.io
lyrical.io
majestic.io
marvelous.io
mindless.io
married.io
mere.io
jolly.io
nasty.io
perfect.io
private.io
psychedelic.io
shallow.io
silky.io
silly.io
sparkling.io
spectacular.io
romantic.io
roomy.io
rustic.io
selective.io
shrill.io
rural.io
stormy.io
successful.io
tricky.io
unused.io
uppity.io
tested.io
tangy.io
thoughtful.io
taboo.io
thick.io
volatile.io
wicked.io
clammy.co
bumpy.co
weak.io
equable.co
feeble.co
flowery.co
grandiose.co
hateful.co
honorable.co
hulking.co
jagged.co
detailed.co
glib.co
gusty.co
fascinated.co
hollow.co
flimsy.co
obedient.co
purring.co
spiky.co
undesirable.co
murky.co
spotty.co
snotty.co
smoggy.co
soggy.co
wakeful.co
wasteful.co
worried.co
bewildered.me
brash.me
cagey.me
clammy.me
frail.me
gamy.me
gusty.me
faulty.me
frightening.me
wiggly.co
flaky.me
fearful.me
fascinated.me
eatable.me
handsomely.me
hideous.me
homely.me
hulking.me
insidious.me
kindhearted.me
lacking.me
maddening.me
measly.me
obnoxious.me
omniscient.me
overconfident.me
raspy.me
redundant.me
seemly.me
shaky.me
snobbish.me
snotty.me
sordid.me
incompetent.me
obtainable.me
hushed.me
harmonious.me
sulky.me
tasteless.me
tearful.me
verdant.me
wistful.me
drain.cc
exist.cc
harm.cc
gaze.cc
unused.me
wasteful.me
haunt.cc
tangy.me
divide.cc
wakeful.me
threatening.me
examine.cc
drag.cc
kneel.cc
permit.cc
sigh.cc
wrap.cc
bruise.co
interrupt.co
bubble.io
rely.cc
punch.cc
subtract.cc
admire.io
slap.cc
bore.io
afford.io
brake.io
blush.io
grate.co
prick.co
soak.cc
muddle.io
precede.io
return.io
hate.io
squeak.io
observe.io
hurry.io
drain.io
inject.io
intend.io
jail.io
rhyme.io
lighten.io
prick.io
thaw.io
walk.io
whistle.io
productive.cc
encouraging.co
teeny.io
accidental.cc
quaint.us
identify.io
marked.cc
deserted.us
obtainable.co
icky.cc
false.io
quizzic.al
boil.io
unequ.al
rainy.io
wreck.io
belong.io
wacky.io
different.io
avera.ge
sturdy.cc
loving.io
panoramic.io
lowly.me
hysteric.al
superfici.al
yawn.io
strap.io
vulgar.io
worry.io
versed.me
unnatur.al
disagr.ee
heavy.io

Announcing: Dictionary Domains – Unregistered Domains For Your Next Project

Being a person who loves to make things (primarily web things), I often find myself trying to name products and find domain names. Finding a fitting name is tough, and finding a domain name to match just sucks. Painful.

So I’m happy to show off a new project that I’ve built, Dictionary Domains:

Dictionary word domain names that are available

There’s some pretty great tools out there that help: I’m a big fan of Lean Domain Search, back in the day I used Bust A Name a ton, and Domainr it’s modern counter part.

But really, I’m a huge fan of simple {dictionary word}.{tld} domains. I’d happily compromise on the .com extension to get something clean and meaningful.

So, that’s the point of Dictionary Domains. To make it ridiculously easy to find simple verb/noun/adjective domains for your next project. Hopefully you find it helpful.

Find your next domain name! → 


 

 

Now easily add the people who went to a concert with you | SeenDB

It’s now easy to add the people who went to a concert with you. When you are adding a concert there’s a new field, “Who did you go with?“. Here you can enter the email addresses of all the people who attended with you.

Who Attended The Concert?

If you include somebody who already has a SeenDB account, the concert will automatically be added to their concert history. If they don’t have an account yet, we’ll send them an email invitation and the concert will automatically be added to their concert history once they sign up. Easy peasy.

If you want to add attendees to a concert you’ve already created you can do that from the concert’s page. On the right side there’s a link to “+ Add Attendees“:

Concert Attendees - SeenDB

Head to SeenDB to try it out! → 


 

 

Introducing: The Past Concert Search Engine by SeenDB

Remembering the concerts you’ve been to can be tough. That’s why I’m happy to show off a brand new SeenDB feature, The Past Concert Search Engine!

You just enter the info you remember, like the band, location, and/or year to easily find concerts. Like “Modest Mouse Portland” or “Modest Mouse Portland 2002” and voilà!

Search Past Concerts

As a bonus, with just 1 click, you can add the concert to your history, without having to type in the all the event info. Super handy!

Add Past Concert To Concert History

See the Past Concert Search Engine in action! → 


 

 

SeenDB now automatically adds setlists to your concerts

I’m happy to tell you that SeenDB now automatically adds setlists to your concerts!

SeenDB  automatically checks each of your concerts for setlists from the show (thank you Setlist.fm!) and brings them right into your Concert History.

You’ll notice a new icon in your concert listings that denote concerts with setlists:

Concert Setlists on SeenDB

Here’s an example of what a setlist looks like on the concert page:

Concert Setlists on SeenDB

The goal of SeenDB is to be the place for all of your concert memories. Setlists are another step towards realizing that goal.

A big thanks to Adrien Magnus for suggesting this feature! If you have ideas for new features too, let me know on the feature request page.

Cheers,
Justin

Log into SeenDB to see your setlists! →